The exhibition Boerenzij by Wapke Feenstra sheds light on the fusion of multicultural farm life in the South of Rotterdam. Rotterdam South has been a refuge for migrants from all over the world for more than a century. These migrants have enriched the Boerenzij by combining their traditional way of farming with traditional Dutch farming techniques. Brutus award winner Wapke Feenstra visits these seasoned professionals to learn more about the farm life of various cultures. However, De Boerenzij faces an increasingly intense problem: the gentrification of their trusted community. The inhabitants of the Boerenzij are increasingly being driven out by large capital that is settling down in the South of Rotterdam. Will the inhabitants of the Boerenzij find a way to counter gentrification? In the exhibition Boerenzij artist Wapke Feenstra tries to find an answer to this question.

Website
MYVILLAGES

Wapke Feenstra is co-founder of Myvillages (2003), an artist collective set up to advocate for a new understanding of the rural as a place of and for cultural production. They work with formats that are close to the everyday – a communal lunch, a slide show in the village hall, a walk across the fields, a market stall. Myvillages uses drawing as a method of learning and connecting from the start. They have set up long-term and ongoing trans-local infrastructures to make connections between people and places, such as the International Village Shop and the Rural School of Economics. Feenstra lives and works in Rotterdam. Her recent commissions include the Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst Leipzig, Times Museum in Guangzhou, OK_Video in Jakarta, Whitechapel Gallery in London, Potato Growers at the Istanbul Biennale 2019 and with Rural School of Economics – Rural Undercurrents in Kassel she is a part of an experimental network of knowledge production in Lumbung documenta fifteen in Kassel.

The exhibition is on show from October 7 - November 20
Thursday - Sunday: 12 to 6 PM
Friday evening: 6 to 9 PM
Tickets

About Brutus

Founded in 2008 by sculptor Joep van Lieshout whose transgressive practice over the last three decades has shed light on what a foundation of tomorrow could look like, Brutus uses its architecture as a collaborative material to inform its multi-disciplinary program. Host to complicated installations, challenging performances, massive group shows and impressive solo exhibitions. Brutus offers artists time, space, freedom and funds to experiment, to perform and to exhibit at a massive scale. Brutus is now 6000 square meters with a sculpture park, residency, and grants the Brutus Prize. Brutus exists to create a space where anything is possible for artists to explore, dream big and build even bigger.

Follow Us